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A Source for Workplace Safety News and Notes - from ComplianceSigns.com

April 27, 2017

NSC: Construction Workers Say Productivity Trumps Safety on Worksites

Employee perceptions of workplace safety April 2017
A National Safety Council survey found 58% of US construction workers feel that safety takes a back seat to productivity and completing job tasks. What's more, 51% say management does only the minimum required by law to keep employees safe, and 47% say employees are afraid to report safety issues. By comparison, 36% of employees in 144 other industries surveyed feel their employers prioritize productivity over safety.

The Employee Perceptions of Workplace Safety findings were released just ahead of Workers' Memorial Day on April 28 and the National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction, May 8-12.

A total of 4,836 people died in workplace incidents in 2015, and 937 of those killed were construction workers, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Falls are the second leading cause of death in the workplace, and more than half of fall-related deaths each year occur in the construction industry, according to Injury Facts 2017.

"Sadly the results of our survey indicate that many workers still worry about whether they will make it home safely tonight, said NSC President and CEO Deborah A.P. Hersman. "We call on all employers to renew their commitment to keep everyone safe, on every job, each and every day."  

Gauging perceptions toward safety at work may help provide further insight into workplace deaths. Other key findings from workers across all industries include:

  • 32% feel management ignores worker safety performance when determining promotions
  • 62% say everyone is involved in solving job safety issues
  • 63% of employees feel they work in areas or at stations that are set up ergonomically correct
  • 48% of employees believe safety meetings are held less often than they should be
  • 47% believe performance standards are higher for job tasks than for safety; this percentage is higher among construction industry workers, where 67% feel this way
  • 33% of employees working in transportation and warehousing do not agree that management has a written policy that expresses their attitude about employee safety
The survey is based on the Council's Employee Perception Surveys.

Resources:



April 18, 2017

April Workplace Safety News & Notes

Here's a collection of safety news from around the web:

Keep out from under crane loadsRevised Design Standard for Below-the-hook Lifting Devices

The ASME BTH-1 standard for the design of below-the-hook lifting devices has been revised. The new edition, released as ASME BTH-1-2017 - Design of Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices, updates and supersedes the 2014 version of the standard, continuing to serve as a guide for designers, manufacturers, purchasers, and users of below-the-hook lifting devices. Read more here.


OSHA Delays Enforcement of Construction Silica Standard

OSHA has announced a delay in enforcement of the crystalline silica standard that applies to the construction industry. The agency has determined that additional guidance for employers is necessary due to the unique nature of the requirements in the construction standard. Originally scheduled to begin June 23, 2017, enforcement will now begin Sept. 23, 2017. OSHA expects employers in the construction industry to continue to take steps either to come into compliance with the new permissible exposure limit, or to implement specific dust controls for certain operations as provided in Table 1 of the standard. Construction employers should also continue to prepare to implement the standard's other requirements, including exposure assessment, medical surveillance and employee training. Read the OSHA news release.


New OHSN Modules Track Sharps Injuries and Blood and Body Fluid Exposures

Sharps Disposal Only
NIOSH has announced the release of two new modules that track sharps incidents and blood and body fluid exposures for healthcare workers using the Occupational Health Safety Network (OHSN). This network collects existing injury data to help identify jobs that are at the highest risk for injury within their facility. The new modules help employers and employees track and analyze most of the common, high risk, preventable injury and exposure events among healthcare workers. Learn more.


Employer Resources for Distracted Driving Awareness Month

No dialling talking texting while driving
Every April the National Safety Council promotes Distracted Driving Awareness Month to raise awareness of the many dangers of distracted driving. The NSC offers a variety of materials to support distracted driving education, including these resources for employers: A company cell phone policy kit, a case study of a major US company that banned cell phone use, and a new distracted driving online course. Learn more here.


Upcoming Free Safety Webinars Presented by OH&S

April 27 - Eye Injury Prevention: Let's Take a Closer Look
May 10 - FR PPE Standards - Compliance vs Certification
May 11 - Safety Initiatives in the Upstream Oil & Gas Industry
May 24 - Beat the Heat: An Intro to Heat Stress
Learn more or sign up here.

April 13, 2017

2017 National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls May 8-12

Fall protection required
Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction employees, accounting for 350 of the 937 construction fatalities recorded in 2015 (BLS data). To help reduce construction falls, employers and workers are invited to participate in the fourth annual National Safety Stand-Down to prevent falls in construction, to be held May 8-12. The week-long outreach event encourages employers and workers to pause during the work day to talk about fall hazards and prevention.

What is a Safety Stand-Down?


A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Any workplace can hold a stand-down by taking a break to focus on fall hazards and reinforcing the importance of fall prevention. It's an opportunity for employers to have a conversation with employees about hazards, protective methods, and

April 11, 2017

ABC Report: Safety Best Practices Can Reduce Construction Incidents Up to 87 Percent

Entering construction zone
Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) has released its 2017 Safety Performance Report, which shows that implementing the ABC's Safety Training Evaluation Process can reduce recordable incidents by up to 87 percent, making the best-performing companies 770 percent safer than the industry average.

“ABC’s third annual report on the use of leading indicators, such as substance abuse programs and new hire safety orientations, confirms that high-performing ABC members have safer construction jobsites,” said ABC President and CEO Michael Bellaman. “This is one of the few studies of commercial and industrial construction firms doing real work on real projects, and it shows that implementing best practices can produce world-class construction safety programs.”

5 Steps to Implementing a Workplace AED Program

First Aid Kit AED Inside
More than 400 workplace fatalities each year are caused by cardiac arrest. Immediate CPR and use of an AED can double or triple survival rates. It's not difficult to implement an AED program, and the American Heart Association can help. The Association has developed a variety of materials to guide employers through the steps to a successful and efficient AED program. Resources include: Implementation Guide, State Law Resources, a Q&A and a list of FDA-approved AED manufacturers.

What to know about AEDs

The automated external defibrillator (AED) is a computerized medical device. An AED can check a person’s heart rhythm, recognize a rhythm that requires a shock and advise the

April 5, 2017

Tips to Reduce Workplace Noise Exposure

Hearing protection required
Exposure to noise at work can harm workers’ health. The most well-known effect of noise at work is loss of hearing, a problem documented since the 1700s. Other effects of workplace noise include increased risk of accidents, impaired communication, reduced productivity and a variety of health problems - including suspected effects on unborn children. But some workplaces are inherently noisy. Fortunately, a variety of measures can be taken to reduce or control occupational noise levels.

Although hearing PPE may be the first control people think of, PPE is considered the least effective option for noise hazard control. The hierarchy of controls, from most to least effective, is:

  • Eliminating the hazard source
  • Substitute with less-noisy equipment
  • Engineering controls that isolate people from the hazard
  • Administrative controls that change the way people work
  • PPE that addresses the worker, not the source of the noise

A recent article by OH&S discusses aspects of noise reduction and ways to make your

March 28, 2017

March 2017 Workplace Safety News & Notes

Here's a collection of safety news from around the web:

Keep OSHA 300A Injury and Illness Summaries Posted Through April
OSHA reminds employers to post a copy of Form 300A, which summarizes job-related injuries and illnesses logged during 2016. The summary must be displayed from February through April in a common area where notices to employees are usually posted. Businesses with 10 or fewer employees and those in certain low-hazard industries are exempt from OSHA recordkeeping and posting requirements. 

April 3-7 is National Work Zone Awareness Week
Highway construction season is just around the corner. So is National Work Zone Awareness Week, April 3-7. The annual event brings national attention to motorist and

March 20, 2017

Job Safety Analysis is First Step to Worksite Safety - and More

Entering construction zone
Employees on a construction site don't work in a vacuum. Even when they perform duties in separate areas, their tasks and timelines may cross over one another. Keeping everyone safe - and the job progressing - requires cooperation and careful planning.

A critical first step in planning is the job safety analysis, which is a formal effort to identify and document hazards associated with specific tasks, so workers can take the proper actions to protect themselves.

The safety experts at Safety Management Group in Indianapolis have penned an interesting article that defines when, where and

OSHA's 'Safe and Sound' Campaign Helps Employers Keep Workplaces Safe and Healthy

America works safely 365 days with no accidents
In response to recent workplace fatalities, OSHA has launched the Safe and Sound Campaign calling on employers to review their safety and health programs to protect workers and reduce workplace injuries and deaths. By identifying and controlling job-related hazards that can lead to injuries and illnesses, businesses can improve their safety and health programs, save money and improve competitiveness. 

The program includes recommended practices for setting up a safety and health program, as well as Safe+Sound Week in June - a nationwide event to raise awareness and understanding of the value of proactive safety and health programs in workplaces.

A Proven Approach to Safety

Employers have proven that safety and health programs reduce the numbers of injuries and

March 8, 2017

Study: Young Construction Workers Disregard Hearing Protection

Ear protection required
A recent workplace safety study shows that young construction workers commonly disregard hearing protection that could prevent noise-induced hearing loss later in life. Among young Canadian construction workers, 24 per cent reported not wearing hearing protection, compared to 13 per cent of workers over the age of 50 and 11 per cent of workers in all other age groups. They are also less likely to wear hearing protection compared to young workers in other industries, such as manufacturing and primary resources.

These are results from a 2016 study by WorkSafe BC in British Columbia. Data was collected in 2016 from more than 160,000 hearing tests. Hearing loss can go unnoticed