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A Source for Workplace Safety News and Notes - from ComplianceSigns.com ®

August 28, 2017

Boat Safety Tips for Work or Play

Whether you use boats for work or recreation, these boat safety tips from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources will help you avoid trouble on the water and get home safely.

Operator inexperience, inattention, recklessness and speeding are the four leading causes of tragic watercraft crashes. The leading cause of death is drowning. Crash statistics indicate boaters who wear life jackets and take boater safety courses are most likely to stay safe on the water. Follow these basic safety tips to safely enjoy boating for work or pleasure.

No alcohol beyond this pointLeave Alcohol Onshore

  • Never use drugs or alcohol before or during boat operation. 
  • Alcohol's effects are greatly exaggerated by exposure to sun, glare, wind, noise and vibration.  
  • Watch a Boating Under the Influence video.


Use and Maintain the Right Safety Equipment

Life jacket required
Have a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket for each person onboard and one approved throwable device for any boat 16 feet and longer. The DNR recommends that everyone wear their lifejackets while on the water.
  • Have a fire extinguisher.
  • Have operable boat lights - Always test boat lights before the boat leaves the dock and carry extra batteries. 
  • Take emergency supplies - Keep on board in a floating pouch: cell phone, maps, flares and first aid kit.
Learn about some key equipment to keep you safe in this boating safety equipment video.

August 25, 2017

Workplace Safety News & Notes - August 2017

Here's a collection of safety news from around the web:

ISO Adopts New Arc Flash Symbol

arc flash triangle label
There was no single standardized graphic for an arc flash explosion hazard until ISO adopted a symbol meaning “To warn of an arc flash.” The new arc flash symbol has been registered in ISO 7010 Graphical symbols – Safety colors and safety signs – Registered safety signs. The symbol went through a three year registration process prior to its adoption into ISO 7010. ComplianceSigns.com has arc flash safety signs and labels with the new symbol.

September MSHA Initiative Focuses on Less-Experienced Miners


MSHA data show that less-experienced miners, both at a mine and at a specific occupation, suffer injuries at a higher rate than more experienced miners. To address this trend, the agency has launched a training assistance initiative to focus on younger workers. Staff from the agency’s division of Coal Mine Safety and Health and training specialists from Educational Field and Small Mine Services will visit coal mines through September 30 to focus on training of inexperienced miners. Learn more.

New Drive Safely Work Week Campaign on Distracted Driving Released
no dialing no texting no talking while driving


Drive Safely Work Week™ (DSWW) has been an annual campaign sponsored by the Network of Employers for Traffic Safety (NETS) for many years. Instead of a single campaign, DSWW is now delivered more frequently, with a tighter focus on specific behaviors. The current module targets distracted driving. A new campaign in October will feature impaired driving. All materials are available at no cost. See more on DSWW campaigns.

The Risks of Prolonged Sitting - or Standing - at Work


August 22, 2017

Learn How to Protect Your Business from Disaster

Emergency Response Plan
How quickly a business can get return to operation after a tornado, fire, flood or civil emergency often depends on emergency planning done well beforehand. Natural disasters can - and do - occur at any time, but up to 40 percent of businesses affected by a disaster never re-open. Your organization is more likely to survive if it plans carefully, puts emergency procedures in place and practices for all kinds of emergencies. These are the messages being shared during the 2017 National Preparedness Month in September.

Disasters Don't Plan Ahead. You Can.


National Preparedness Month is designed to raise awareness and encourage Americans to take steps to prepare for emergencies in their homes, schools, workplace, organizations, businesses and places of worship. The month is sponsored by the Ready Campaign, a joint effort of FEMA and the Ad Council. Ready, and its Spanish-language version Listo, ask individuals and businesses to take four key actions:

  1. Stay informed about the different types of emergencies that could occur and their appropriate responses
  2. Make an emergency plan
  3. Build an emergency supply kit
  4. Get involved in your community by taking action to prepare for emergencies

August 21, 2017

NIOSH Launches Mobile Lifting Calculator App

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has a new, free mobile application (app) that can help workers stay safe when manually lifting objects as part of their job. The app, NLE Calc, is based on the Revised NIOSH Lifting Equation (RNLE), an internationally recognized standard for safe lifting.

The new app can assist workers in manufacturing, healthcare, retail and other industries where lifting is part of the job. NLE Calc determines a score based on the data you enter about your lifting task and provides recommendations to help you optimize the task, or perform it differently, in order to prevent injury.

Features of the new app:
  • Calculates the composite lifting index (CLI) for multiple lifting tasks
  • Uses equations approved by NIOSH ergonomists
  • Promotes better musculoskeletal health and prevention benefits
  • Raises workers’ awareness about their job tasks
  • Helps workers make informed decisions about the potential hazards to their musculoskeletal health
  • Serves as job design guidelines for manual lifting tasks
  • Can be used as a research tool to collect manual lifting data

August 15, 2017

5 Online Resources That Create a Safer Work Environment

Not that long ago, if company owners or foremen wanted to get information about workplace safety, they had to either purchase and peruse through heavy books filled with rules and regulations or schedule an appointment with a safety inspector. Now, thanks to the internet, construction site managers and others who are concerned about this important issue can access pertinent information from their desktop, smartphone or laptop.

Of course, the ComplianceSigns CONNECTION workplace safety blog is a good source for information that can make your workplace a little safer - and your job a little easier. We compile, curate and share information from a wide range of sources to save you the time of visiting dozens of sites. Here are four additional online resources that anyone who is interested in workplace safety may want to bookmark:

August 14, 2017

Study Shows Workplace Deaths Rising Among Older Workers

This department has worked __ days without a lost time accident
A study conducted by the Associated Press shows older people are dying on the job at a higher rate than workers overall, even as the overall rate of workplace fatalities decreases. In 2015, about 35 percent of fatal workplace accidents involved a worker age 55 or older.

This is not exactly a new trend. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported fatal work injury rates for workers 55 years and older were higher than the overall U.S. rate in 2010, and the rate for workers 65 years of age and older was more than three times the rate for all workers. Between 2006 and 2015 the rate of fatal accidents among older workers was 50 to 65 percent higher than for all workers.

The percentage of older employees in the workplace has increased some 37 percent in recent years, and experts on aging caution against stereotyping older workers, because people of all ages have a wide range of physical and mental abilities. There are steps employers can take to help improve safety for older workers, but recent research also shows younger workers benefit from increased safety efforts, as well. So perhaps the best approach is an increased focus on occupational safety for all workers, which can include prominent machine safety signs and other safety reminders.


August 3, 2017

National Safety Council: 97 Percent of Workers Report Fatigue Factors

Stay Alert Safety Banner
According to a new National Safety Council survey-based report, 43 percent of Americans say they do not get enough sleep and are at risk of fatigue that can reduce their ability to think clearly, make informed decisions and be productive on the job and at home.

Fatigue in the Workplace: Causes & Consequences of Employee Fatigue shows that 97 percent of Americans say they have at least one of the leading nine risk factors for fatigue, which include working at night or in the early morning, working long shifts without regular breaks, working more than 50 hours each week and enduring long commutes. More than three of four Americans say they feel tired at work, 53 percent feel less productive and 44 percent have trouble focusing. Fatigued employees are more likely to make critical safety errors that could lead to injury.