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A Source for Workplace Safety News and Notes - from ComplianceSigns.com ®

October 31, 2017

3 Ways to Rework the Working Culture for Better Results

For over a decade American vacation habits have been on the decline. Taking proper time off from work has been a challenge for a vast number of American workers and their employers. Vacation time has been notoriously left unclaimed and when on vacation, many employees have an “always on” mentality, which means they’re working remotely, instead of truly embracing rest and relaxation.

In 2016 alone, 662 million vacation days were left on the table, according to research from Project Time Off. Employers, CEOs and managers all have a responsibility when it comes to empowering staff members to take time off. Project Time Off also found that more than a quarter of their survey respondents feared that taking a vacation or time off from work made them appear less dedicated to their job and duties. Business leaders can help rework the working vacation culture in America - and improve business results at the same time. Here are three ways to get started.

October 26, 2017

Workplace Safety News & Notes - October 2017

Here's a collection of workplace safety news from around the web:

OSHA Enforcing Crystalline Silica Standard in Construction

The 30-day enforcement phase-in of OSHA's respirable crystalline silica standard for construction is now over, so inspectors are free to issue citations for employers not in comnpliance with the new rule. OSHA has also published a silica compliance guide to help small businesses comply with the new requirements. Read more about the new silica rules.
 

Hallowen Safety Tips

Check out these tips from the CDC to help make Halloween and other fall festivities fun and safe for employees, trick-or-treaters and party guests. Get Halloween Safety Tips.
 

New No-Cost Respiratory Protection Program Training Available

NIOSH and the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN) recently released a new, no-cost Respiratory Protection Program Training. The program includes a respiratory protection course and accompanying resources for occupational health professionals who want to learn more about OSHA's Respiratory Protection Standard and the role of the respiratory protection program administrator. Learn more at the AAOHN website.
 

Deadline for New OSHA Walking-Working Surfaces Rule is Nov. 17

October 19, 2017

Workplace Hearing Loss - What You Need To Know

Noise area may cause hearing loss use proper protection
Hazardous noise in the workplace affects some 22 million U.S. workers, and NIOSH reports that some 10 million workers incur permanent hearing loss annually. If workers must raise their voice to speak to someone an arm's length away, noise levels may be loud enough to damage hearing. October is Protect Your Hearing Month - a good time to review your hearing protection program and to remind workers that noise-induced hearing loss is preventable.

Work Related Hearing Loss is a Major Problem

Among workers exposed to occupational noise, 23 percent have reported difficulty hearing, 15 percent reported tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and nine percent suffered both conditions. That makes noise-related hearing loss the most common work-related injury in the U.S. Hearing loss disability costs businesses an estimated $242 million annually in workers' compensation. Workers with hearing loss often have trouble localizing sounds or hearing warning signals and have an increased risk of accidents. Tinnitus can disrupt sleep and concentration, increasing fatigue, impacting alertness, degrading performance and potentially increasing risks for accidents on and off the job.

October 17, 2017

OSHA: Raised Pallet Work Platforms Can Be Deadly

Safety harness required
OSHA is warning employees and employers about the dangers of using a pallet raised by a forklift as a work platform. This potentially deadly combination is sometimes used to perform tasks such as reaching upper levels of shelves or storage racks. A new OSHA FatalFacts sheet details the death of a warehouse worker who died after falling seven feet from a raised pallet, and also gives advice to avoid such incidents in your own facility.

At this particular warehouse, it was common practice for workers to place one foot or both feet on a pallet and move inventory on the top shelf while a coworker lifted them to the top shelf using the forklift. The featured worker slipped on the pallet while moving inventory and fell. He died in a hospital a few days later.

October 12, 2017

Fatal Traffic Crashes Increased in 2016 - What Can Employers Do?

According to a recent DOT announcement, 37,461 lives were lost on U.S. roads in 2016, an increase of 5.6 percent from calendar year 2015. The number of vehicle miles traveled on U.S. roads in 2016 increased by 2.2 percent, and resulted in a fatality rate of 1.18 deaths per 100 million vehicle miles travelled - a 2.6-percent increase from the previous year.

These numbers come from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which recently released fatal traffic crash data for calendar year 2016, collected from all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Fatalities in crashes involving large tucks increased from 4,094 in 2015 to 4,317 in 2016. Of those deaths, just 17 percent were truck occupants. The remaining deaths were occupants of other vehicles (72 percent) or non-occupants (11 percent). 


October 10, 2017

OSHA Delays Enforcement of Crystalline Silica Standard in Construction

wear respirator in this area
OSHA Respirator Safety Sign
Enforcement of OSHA’s respirable crystalline silica standard for construction went into effect on Sept. 23, but the agency announced a 30-day enforcement phase-in to help employers comply with the new standard. That gives employers about 2 more weeks of leeway on compliance. Compliance assistance will be offered to employers making good faith efforts to comply during the first 30 days, but citations may be considered for employers not making any efforts to comply.

The Respirable Crystalline Silica construction standard, 29 CFR § 1926.1153, establishes a new 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 50 µg/m3, an action level (AL) of 25 µg/m3, and a host of ancillary requirements. During the first 30 days of enforcement, OSHA will carefully evaluate good faith efforts taken by employers in their attempts to meet the new construction silica standard. OSHA will render compliance assistance and outreach to assure that covered employers are fully and properly complying with its requirements. OSHA has also published a silica compliance guide to help small businesses comply with the new rule.

Silica Dangers


October 5, 2017

New No-Cost Respiratory Protection Program Training Available

NIOSH and the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN) recently released a new, no-cost Respiratory Protection Program Training. The program includes a respiratory protection course and accompanying resources for occupational health professionals who want to learn more about OSHA's Respiratory Protection Standard and the role of the respiratory protection program administrator.

This training satisfies the annual Federal OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard's (1910.134 CFR) training requirements. You do NOT need to be an AAOHN member to participate in this free training or access the training resources.

Different programs are offered to meet needs of varied audiences, including:
  • Safety professionals in organizations required to follow OSHA's respiratory protection standard
  • Safety professionals in healthcare facilities
  • Primary or ancillary healthcare workers

Learn more at the AAOHN website.

October 3, 2017

How To Protect Workers from Solvent Safety Challenges

Highly flammable solvents in area
OSHA Solvent Safety Sign
Workplace hazards such as confined spaces, moving machinery, low clearances and hot surfaces pose significant threats to workers, and are typically marked with appropriate chemical safety signs and labels to draw attention to them. But there are other equally dangerous hazards that can easily go unnoticed until it's too late to take preventive action. These sneaky hazards are solvents - chemicals commonly used to clean up paints, greases and oils, or contained in liquids such as paint, pesticides and ink, to name a few.

Because solvents are so common at work and home, workers may not give them the safety attention they deserve. Yet solvent exposure can damage skin, eyes, internal organs and respiratory tissue - as well as cause fires and explosions. Clearly, workers need to be aware of