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A Source for Workplace Safety News and Notes - from ComplianceSigns.com ®

February 28, 2018

Workplace Safety News & Notes - February 2018


Here's a collection of safety news from around the web:

List of Active OSHA Emphasis Programs

OSHA currently has nine active National and Special Emphasis Programs under enforcement. They include: Compustible dust, Hazardous machinery, Hexavalent chromium, Lead, Process safety management, Trenching & excavation and others. See the full index and get details on each program here.

Updated ISO 31000:2018 Risk Management - Guidelines Now Available

The revised ISO 31000:2018 standard includes changes to nearly every section. It provides a common approach to managing risk and is not industry- or sector-specific. It can be used throughout the life of an organization and applied to any activity, including all levels of decision-making. Learn more.

OSHA Now Accepting 2017 Form 300A Data Submissions

Employers can now to electronically report their Calendar Year 2017 Form 300A data to OSHA. All covered establishments must submit the information by July 1, 2018. OSHA provides a secure website with three options for data submission: Manually entering data into a web form; Upload a CSV file to process single or multiple establishments at the same time; or users of automated recordkeeping systems will have the ability to transmit data electronically via an API (application programming interface). Learn more.

February 20, 2018

Top OSHA Fines Reach $1.77 Million in First 6 Weeks of 2018

OSHA has released information on nine significant fines (over $100,000) so far this year, with five fines at or over $200,000. Common violations include fall, confined space and machine guard violations. Here are details on the top fines to date. Many are still pending final decisions.

$281,583 after fatal wall collapse at a New Jersey construction company
A New Jersey construction management and development company faces $281,583 in fines for exposing employees to crushing hazards after a concrete block retaining wall collapsed at a Poughkeepsie worksite. The retaining wall was not designed or approved by a registered engineer, and its collapse led to an employee death and injuries to another employee. The company was also cited for failing to train employees to keep a safe distance from the wall and soil pile, and failing to provide proper fall protection. See details here.

$256,088 for fall and confined space violations at a Georgia manufacturer
DANGER confined space permit required sign
Following inspection of a facility in Dalton, OSHA issued willful citations for failing to install a fall protection system, and develop and implement a written permit-required confined-space program. The company was also cited for several other violations, including failing to develop safety procedures when performing equipment maintenance and servicing; failing to train and evaluate forklift operators; failing to ensure employees have proper personal protective equipment; and failing to install machine guards on equipment. See details.

$212,396 for crush hazards at Massachusetts foundation company
A foundation company was cited for failing to protect employees against crushing hazards while they installed permanent foundation supports beneath a public library. This resulted in an employee death when a 2,600-pound rock dislodged from the building’s foundation and struck the worker. The contractor was also cited for failing to instruct employees to recognize and avoid unsafe conditions while working beneath the foundation. OSHA cited the company for similar hazards in 2015 when an employee was pinned by a granite block that came loose. The company faces $212,396 in proposed penalties. See details.

February 19, 2018

Why and How You Need to Take Care of Your Company Cars

As a business owner who has invested in a company-owned cars, maintaining the safety of these vehicles is ultimately your responsibility. And it's pretty important, too. Case in point: More than 44,000 vehicle accidents each year are attributed to issues with brakes, tires, steering and engine components, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Indeed, many of these accidents could have been prevented with proper vehicle maintenance and routine inspections. With that in mind, here are a few key considerations to help keep your vehicle fleet in top condition:

It's Good for Company Morale


Heed the advice of Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson: If you want your employees to take good care of your business, then you must take care of them. The same can be said for maintaining your company vehicles. The way you manage your fleet of vehicles is another opportunity to illustrate your appreciation for your team.

Smoke free vehicle label with heart shape
After consulting your team's schedules, make sure to schedule regular maintenance to make these services convenient for everyone. You might also look into having a mobile car wash service visit your company regularly to keep your fleet looking great. And consider a no-smoking policy to keep them smelling clean. Vehicle no-smoking labels will help protect your investment and keep employees happy.

Not only will this keep your vehicles in top condition, but it will also show your team you value their comfort and safety.

Maintenance is Your Responsibility


Whether you do it yourself or rely on the professionals, vehicle maintenance is your responsibility as the company owner. Don't leave this task to your employees; instead, you can designate a fleet specialist to keep everything running in top form.

February 5, 2018

Workplace Foot Injuries: Causes, Costs and Prevention

Foot injuries are among the most common workers' compensation injuries, including breaks, fractures and heel injuries. A study of over 250,000 worker's comp claims found the average final settlement for a foot injury is more than $17,000. The human foot and ankle contain 26 bones, 33 joints and more than a hundred muscles, tendons and ligaments, so it's no wonder injuries to the foot can be especially painful - and slow to heal. Clearly, prevention of workplace foot injuries makes good sense for workers and employers. But safety shoes and foot PPE reminder signs aren't enough. This article will explain the causes, costs and prevention steps you can take to reduce foot injuries in your workplace.

Causes of Workplace Foot Injuries

There are two major categories of work-related foot injuries. The first includes foot injuries from punctures, crushing, sprains and lacerations. The second includes injuries resulting from slips, trips and falls. Slips and falls do not always result in a foot injury but lack of attention to foot safety plays an important role in their occurrence.

OSHA has identified six common work-related foot injuries and causes:

    Safety shoes required when using pallet jack sign
  • Crushed or broken feet, amputation of toes or feet - Falling objects, moving vehicles, feet trapped between objects or caught in a crack, conveyor belts
  • Punctures of the sole of the foot - Loose nails, sharp metal or glass objects
  • Cuts or severed feet or toes - Chain saws, rotary mowers, unguarded machinery
  • Burns - Molten metal splashes, chemical splashes, contact with fire, flammable or explosive atmospheres
  • Electric shocks - Static electricity, contact with sources of electricity
  • Sprained or twisted ankles, fractured or broken bones during slips, trips or falls - Slippery floors, littered walkways, incorrect footwear, poor lighting
Additional foot injury hazards exist in many outdoor jobs such as logging, hydro linework and fishing.